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What dresses we will wear this summer? The trends for Summer 2018 suggest various styles, colors and patterns. With a constant thread: a nostalgic penchant for vintage styles. Like the pretty 50s style dresses  worn by  Saoirse Ronan in Brooklyn, or the patterns sported by  Duchess Sarah Ferguson in the 80s. A strong-hued déjà-vu with a few pastel tones.

Of course, there are also more innovative styles that play with patchwork and layering, but the apron and baby doll dresses will be all the rage on the beach and in town. See in the gallery a selection of the best summer dresses spotted on the runway and follow our smart guide to choose the dress that will suit you best:

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  • The patterned summer dress, patchwork styles featuring different layered panels and patterns for a vibrant look. Try an oversized and light style also for work
  • The check & plaid mania: not just for winter, as seen at Prada, where models wore ample pinafore dresses over polo shirts or lightweight blouses. A perfect multi-layered ensembleto flaunt come Spring.
  • The oversized, lightweight dress. Perfect for those who are looking for comfort without sacrificing glamour.
  • The shirtdress: a totally versatile garment, especially in classic white. It’s like a white canvas you can personalize with accessories.
  • The floral dress: leave in your closet tropical prints and embrace botanical patterns. Pastel hued micro florals are back.
  • The polka dot dress: in our opinion it’s the must-have piece for this Summer
  • The baby doll dress: from Chanel to Emporio Armani to John Galliano, many designers offered romantic mini dressesin lace, satin and tweed, perfect for a ‘Lolita’ lows
  • The sequined dress: a go-anywhere and go-to piece for the Summer, see the long style from Attico in lavender tones, or the short cocktail dresses from Alcoolique and Halpern

 

Trends for Summer 2018

 

 

 

 

Written By: Selene Olivia

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The tacro is the latest foodie trend to take over Instagram.

Vive La Tarte debuted the part-taco, part-croissant creation in January. The San Francisco bakery offers three version of the tacro: pulled pork with pineapple, chicken with avocado, and barbecue jackfruit.

 

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The bakery’s creative director, Jimmy Houghton, explained how the tacro was born in an interview with SF Gate published Friday.

“We took our regular croissant dough that we make and we tried to fill it with pulled pork or with chicken, and we found that the flavors didn’t combine well. The pastry was way too rich, way too buttery, way too sweet,” Houghton told the site. “We went back to the drawing board and we said it needs to be saltier, needs to be a bit more savory.”

A Vive La Tarte spokesperson told BuzzFeed the bakery will likely add more flavors, “including a potential breakfast version.”

Food mashup crazes have been constant since New York City’s Dominique Ansel Bakery created the uber-popular Cronut, a croissant-doughnut, in 2013. San Francisco responded with the cruffin, a croissant-muffin, in 2015. Now the Bay Area also has the tacro.

 It may be a bit late for West Coast foodies to celebrate Tuesday’s National Croissant Day, but fortunately Taco Tuesday comes around every week.
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Written By: Carolina Moreno
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Discover Good Food’s hottest trends in food and drink for 2018, including meat-free burgers, alcohol-free spirits and more innovative ways to eat healthy.

Over the last year, we’ve seen a wide range of food and drink trends reflecting changing attitudes towards health, community and the environment. We’ve seen a brunch boom, buddha bowls aplenty and of course, the avocado craze.

It seems 2018 is set to be a year of even more adventurous veggie and vegan cuisine while the rise of hyper-local cooking and exciting advances in technology take a firmer hold on British food culture. Wondering what to expect from the future of food and drink? Check out the BBC Good Food team’s predictions for the coming year.

1. Gut-friendly food

With fermenting, pickling and preserving reaching the mainstream, our panel agree that gut health is set to be a big food trend for 2018. This includes probiotics like kimchi, miso and kefir and prebiotics such as onions, garlic and other alliums.

 

Pickles in jar

2. Booze-free beverages

Good Food columnist Tony Naylor cites non-alcoholic drinks as a growth area in the food and drink industry, and our supermarket forecasters say that health-conscious millennials are drinking booze less and less. Premium tonic waters with interesting flavours, non-alcoholic ‘spirits’ and botanical mixes are flooding in to fill a gap in the market.

 

Rhubarb cordial

 

3. Hawaiian food

Poke bowls are everyday food in Hawaii – essentially sushi without the fussy presentation. Still relatively hard to find, even in London, next year they will likely cross over into the mainstream. These bowls are endlessly customisable and can be economical, too.

 

Poke bowl

4. Timut pepper

We love exploring new seasonings and we’re not afraid of hot spices. Timut pepper, from Nepal, is spiky, zesty – surprisingly grapefruity – and leaves a tingly residual heat on the palate. It’s also been tipped by sous-chef.co.uk and supermarket giant Asda as being the next big condiment for 2018.

 

5 ways with gin and tonic

5. Specialised tea

Good news for fans of a cuppa – tea is even more popular than before. Sales of herbal and green tea, in particular, continue to rise for consumption at home, so it’s likely that the small number of tea ‘bars’ that we’ve seen popping up may also start to proliferate on the high street. People are beginning to think of tea with the same reverence as coffee for its many varieties.

 

Jasmine & ginger festive tea

6. Hyper-local food

In the UK and many other countries now, there is a growing trend for dishes created with ingredients sourced within walking distance. One of the figureheads for this movement is Danish chef René Redzepi who is doing just that at his two-Michelin-starred Copenhagen restaurant Noma. Tony Naylor observes that at home, too, there are more and more “restaurants are applying a Redzepi-like sense of localism to their ingredients”.

 

Foraging for apples

 

7. Heme

Not available to buy yet, heme – pronounced ‘heem’ (from the Greek word for ‘blood’) – is at the cutting edge of food science, and is a possible stepping stone to more environmentally sustainable meat alternatives. Tech-food start-up Impossible Foods are already using it to bring a meaty quality to their plant-based burger including, yes, the bloodiness of meat cooked rare.

 

Impossible burger

8. Plant-based protein

With more and more chefs embracing ingredients such as tofu, tempeh and quinoa, veganism is on the rise. Food blogger Angry Chef  talks about redefined Indian cuisine (rich with pulses) as a growing trend, with restaurants taking dishes back to their plant-based roots with originality and mass appeal. There’ll be more meat-free days in 2018.

 

Avocado burrito bowl

 

9. Everyday food tech

Having recently purchased Whole Foods, Amazon is now competing with a clutch of smaller outfits who specialise in delivering recipe kits to home chefs, which means an emerging trend is set to become even bigger. Tying in with this, the development of smart fridges will take the hassle out of ordering ingredients by snapping ‘shelfies’ of your food to keep you well-stocked. We can also look forward to more voice-operated gadgets such as Google Home and Alexa to record and order your shopping lists.

 

Food tech

10. South American cuisines

Mexican, Peruvian and Brazilian food along with Japanese-Mexican fusion could well be big this year. ‘Arepas’ [pronounced ‘uh-rey-puhs’, which are corn pizzas-cum-muffins], chicha [‘chee-chuh’, a fermented maize drink] and chulpe corn [‘chool-puh’, used to make snacks] will be prevalent,’ says Georgina Lunn, Product Development Manager at Sainsbury’s. Quinoa and chia seeds have peaked, but purple potatoes, white and purple corn, black quinoa and kiwicha seeds are on the up.

 

Purple potatoes on yellow wooden board

11. Foreign farming in Britain

Luke Farrell from Dorset’s Ryewater Nursery, who has encyclopedic knowledge of Malaysian and Sichuan cuisines, is harvesting rare Asian plant varieties like som saa and pandan (Nigella reckons the latter is the avocado of 2018). Meanwhile, there’s sustainably farmed British tilapia in east London (growup.org.uk), with the waste produced used as fertiliser to grow veg. British farmers are even producing txuleton (pronounced chuleton), the Galician old ox or dairy beef that foodies go wild for.

 

Pandan in serving dish with shaved coconut

 

12. The fourth meal

Brunch, brinner, lunch… are you confused too? Now, we have a fourth meal to contend with. ‘We’ve been watching the fourth meal for months,’ says Jonathan Moore, Waitrose’s executive chef. ‘We’re eating differently. We have breakfast for dinner, dinner for lunch – everything is less structured. The fourth is the final meal, which is normally a treat.’ So, four meals a day – if you have the appetite for it!

 

Two bowls with noodles, broth and meal on bamboo mat with chopsticks

13. Nootropics

The health-conscious will be consuming nootropics – that’s brain food, to you and me – according to trends prediction agency Pearlfisher. Gut health is still a major focus but cognition may now start to take over. Look out for turmeric, salmon, eggs, dandelion greens and jícama (Mexican yam).

 

Bowl of turmeric powder

14. Craft butter

Grant Harrington, of Butter Culture, is elevating the humble yellow block. After a year of research into dairy fermentation, when he built a cabin on a farm in Oxfordshire, the ex-Fäviken chef started supplying butter locally. Now, his rich, buttercup-hued fat, heaped with naturally occurring diacetyl acid – the stuff that makes butter buttery – is omnipresent. Diners are eulogising it in restaurants from Sat Bains in Nottingham to London’s Bibendum.

 

Butter block on knife

15. West African cuisine

Zoe Adjonyoh’s recent cookbook, Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen, about growing up eating grilled tilapia and gingery Scotch bonnet stew, has been influential. Thanks to her, ‘there is scope to show customers how to use different spices,’ says M&S’s Head of Food Product Direction and Innovation, Cathy Chapman. Additionally, Yeo Valley is releasing a limited-edition baobab and vanilla yogurt.

 

Spicy rice in serving dish with spoon on board with peppers

 

 

Written By: BBC Good Food team

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E665TT Baltimore George Peabody Library one of the most beautiful famous libraries in the world.

Correctly submitting all the different pieces of your college application is like a test — one you can easily pass. While the process may seem complicated, a little organization and attention go a long way.Image result for college application

Start early and beat the deadline.

Getting Organized

You can apply to colleges online or through the mail. Online applications can be processed quickly and may have built-in checks to ensure all materials are included. Mailed applications are easier to proofread. Either way, following this advice will set you up to succeed.

Start early. Set deadlines for completing essays, collecting recommendations and filling out forms a few weeks before they’re actually required. Mark these earlier deadlines on your calendar and don’t miss them. College websites are the best place to find accurate deadline information.

Be consistent. Using the exact same name on all your forms makes things easier for admission officers. Decide if you want to use a shortened version of your legal name or your middle name, and then always use the same version. Switching names — going from Bill to Billy, for example — increases the odds that your materials will get misfiled.

Be careful. Careless mistakes on your application can hurt your chances of getting accepted. After you finish an application, put it aside for a day and then check it over for errors. If you can, have a teacher or parent proofread it as well. Save and review online applications before you submit them.

Alert your school. You need to let school officials know which colleges you’re applying to so they can send along your transcripts. The people you ask to write recommendation letters also need to know where you’re applying if they’re mailing the letters themselves.

Completing the Package

Once you’ve completed your application, follow these tips to make sure all the parts get where they’re going.

Don’t wait. Anything that needs to be mailed, including your application itself, should be sent in several weeks before it is due. This allows time for delivery and processing. Online materials should be sent weeks before the deadline as well.

Submit once. When yImage result for college applicationou apply online, you’ll usually get an automated response saying your materials have been received. If you don’t, contact the college’s admission office. Don’t apply online again or mail in another application.

Keep copies. Make a copy of each piece of each application. Save personal identification numbers, passwords, canceled checks and notes or emails from admission officers. This documentation can save you if a problem arises.

Get confirmation. If you mail applications, put a stamped postcard addressed to your house in each package so admission officers can let you know that your materials arrived. The U.S. Post Office also offers a similar “return receipt” service. It may take a few weeks for confirmation cards to reach you.

If you get a notice saying something is missing, don’t panic. Just call the admission office and calmly ask what steps you can take. This is why you wisely saved copies of everything and sent in your application early!

 

 

 

 

 

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What is blockchain technology?

For the past several weeks, you’ve likely heard some of the following terms if you’ve paid attention to the world of finance: Cryptocurrency, Blockchain, Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, and Ethereum. But what do they mean? And why is cryptocurrency suddenly so hot?Bitcoin and Blockchain Financing Trend

First, we’ll explain the blockchain basics.

As society become increasingly digital, financial services providers are looking to offer customers the same services to which they’re accustomed, but in a more efficient, secure, and cost effective way.

Enter blockchain technology.

The origins of blockchain are a bit nebulous. A person or group of people known by the pseudonym Satoshi Nakomoto invented and released the tech in 2009 as a way to digitally and anonymously send payments between two parties without needing a third party to verify the transaction. It was initially designed to facilitate, authorize, and log the transfer of bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies.

How does blockchain technology work?

Blockchain tech is actually rather easy to understand at its core. Essentially, it’s a shared database populated with entries that must be confirmed and encrypted. Think of it as a kind of highly encrypted and verified shared Google Document, in which each entry in the sheet depends on a logical relationship to all its predecessors. Blockchain tech offers a way to securely and efficiently create a tamper-proof log of sensitive activity (anything from international money transfers to shareholder records).

Blockchain’s conceptual framework and underlying code is useful for a variety of financial processes because of the potential it has to give companies a secure, digital alternative to banking processes that are typically bureaucratic, time-consuming, paper-heavy, and expensive.

 

FILE PHOTO: Bitcoin (virtual currency) coins are seen in an illustration picture taken at La Maison du Bitcoin in Paris, France, May 27, 2015. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier/File Photo

What are cryptocurrencies?

Cryptocurrencies are essentially just digital money, digital tools of exchange that use cryptography and the aforementioned blockchain technology to facilitate secure and anonymous transactions. There had been several iterations of cryptocurrency over the years, but Bitcoin truly thrust cryptocurrencies forward in the late 2000s. There are thousands of cryptocurrencies floating out on the market now, but Bitcoin is far and away the most popular.

How do you mine cryptocurrency?

Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrencies don’t just fall out of the sky. Like any other form of money, it takes work to produce them. And that work comes in the form of mining.

But let’s take a step back. Satoshi Nakamoto, the founder of Bitcoin, ensured that there would ever only be 21 million Bitcoins in existence. He (or they) reached that figure by calculating that people would discover, or “mine,” a certain number of blocks of transactions each day.

Every four years, the number of Bitcoins released in relation to the previous cycle gets reduced by 50%, along with the reward to miners for discovering new blocks. At the moment, that reward is 12.5 Bitcoins. Therefore, the total number of Bitcoins in circulation will approach 21 million but never actually reach that figure. This means Bitcoin will never experience inflation. The downside here is that a hack or cyberattack could be a disaster because it could erase Bitcoin wallets with little hope of getting the value back.

As for mining Bitcoins, the process requires electrical energy. Miners solve complex mathematical problems, and the reward is more Bitcoins generated and awarded to them. Miners also verify transactions and prevent fraud, so more miners equals faster, more reliable, and more secure transactions.

Thanks to Satoshi Nakamoto’s designs, Bitcoin mining becomes more difficult as more miners join the fray. In 2009, a miner could mine 200 Bitcoin in a matter of days. In 2014, it would take approximately 98 years to mine just one, according to 99Bitcoins.

Super powerful computers called Application Specific Integrated Circuit, or ASIC, were developed specifically to mine Bitcoins. But because so many miners have joined in the last few years, it remains difficult to mine loads. The solution is mining pools, groups of miners who band together and are paid relative to their share of the work.

Blockchains in Commercial Production at Scale

Current & future uses of blockchain technology & cryptocurrency

Since its inception, Bitcoin has been rather volatile. But based on its recent boom — and a forecast by Snapchat’s first investor, Jeremy Liew, that it would hit $500,000 by 2030 — and the prospect of grabbing a slice of the Bitcoin pie becomes far more attractive.

Bitcoin users expect 94% of all bitcoins to be released by 2024. As the number moves toward the ceiling of 21 million, many expect the profits miners once made from the creation of new blocks to become so low that they will become negligible. But as more bitcoins enter circulation, transaction fees could rise and offset this.

As for blockchain technology itself, it has numerous applications, from banking to the Internet of Things. In the next few years, BI Intelligence expects companies to flesh out their blockchain IoT solutions. Blockchain is a promising tool that will transform parts of the IoT and enable solutions that provide greater insight into assets, operations, and supply chains. It will also transform how health records and connected medical devices store and transmit data.

Blockchain won’t be usable everywhere, but in many cases, it will be a part of the solution that makes the best use of the tools in the IoT arsenal. Blockchain can help to address particular problems, improve workflows, and reduce costs, which are the ultimate goals of any IoT project.

 

 

Written By: Andrew Meola

 

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Summer has finally sprung upon us. Though you may prefer to escape the hustle and bustle in favor of the crisp air near the Aegean Sea, spending summer in the city is truly magical, especially since you can, literally, find a taste of Mediterranean serenity without having to island hop. If you can’t afford an exotic adventure to Greece or Coastal Italy, you can, at least, take your taste buds on vacation.

Cafe Medi

 Serving up dishes inspired by the traditional coastal fare of Spain, Italy, and France, Cafe Medi is not only a go-to for delicious and unique Mediterranean, but also for an amazing ‘gram. The beautiful space boasts an airy atmosphere, complete with high ceilings and stunning murals on the walls. Come summer, there’s also outdoor terrace seating – perfect for pretending you’re catching a seaside breeze.

Cafe Medi, 107 Rivington St.

 

Yefsi Estiatorio

Located on the Upper East Side, Yefsi highlights charm and sophistication in their authentic meals, focusing on appetizer meze dishes. Enjoy a plate of grilled octopus with a chilled Retsina white wine in this dimly lit restaurant. Date night, anyone?

 

Yefsi Estiatorio, 1481 York Ave.

 

Avra

Craving seafood? This upscale eatery on Madison Avenue emanates a “villa vibe” with extended outdoor seating available, displaying fresh whole fish from the Aegean upon entrance.

 

Avra Madison Estiatorio, 14 E 60th St.

The Greek

The Greek Tribeca offers a cozy escape, where creative dishes and natural vines and greenery capture the spotlight, as if you were sitting in an outdoor taverna in Mykonos on a hot summer night.

 

The Greek,  458 Greenwich St. 

Estiatorio Milos

Named after the volcanic island featuring pristine clear-blue water, Milos is an NYC favorite. Its sleek interior truly brings out the contrasting colors native to Greece and sharpens the focus on the incredible seafood.

 

Estiatorio Milos, 125 W 55th St.

Ousia

Just a quick drive down the West Side Highway transports you to the beauty of Greece as you stumble upon Ousia, a recently opened restaurant on 57th and 11th. Conveniently located next to the Landmark movie theater, enjoy a bite of their hummus and pita, maybe some cocktails and a spanakopita, after a show.

 

Ousia, 629 W 57th St.

Souvlaki GR

Walking down the grey and white cobblestones, you will immediately feel as if you’ve stepped foot into a local taverna in Santorini, greeted with white walls and blue straw chairs. If you’re looking for something more laid-back but as equally delicious as an upscale restaurant, journey to Souvlaki GR for their famous bifteki sandwich or a few souvlaki skewers. Sit back, relax, and breathe in the fresh air of Greece while situated in the middle of the Lower East Side.

Souvlaki GR, 116 Stanton St.

Santina

Tired of Greek food? Hop on over to the Amalfi coast for this Italian-Mediterranean fusion restaurant situated just beneath The High Line. The glassed-in, jewel box of a space creates the perfect atmosphere to munch on some seafood and pasta after a day of roaming around Chelsea.

 

Santina, 820 Washington St.

Shuka

A small, intimate setting with colorful plates for curious palates awaits New Yorkers on Macdougal street. Shuka offers Mediterranean fare, creative cocktails, and a trendy clientele. Enjoy shawarma, shakshuka, and other small plates as you wine and dine while seeing and being seen.

 

Shuka, 38 Macdougal St.

 

Written By: Stella Stephanopoulos

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For those who call the concrete jungle home, transporting themselves from Manhattan to Montauk every weekend is enough of a struggle. For most, the commotion to get to the ocean consists of the following: sitting on the Long Island Expressway in bumper-to-bumper traffic, catching the last Hampton Jitney or earliest LIRR, and last but not least, micro-managing the splitting of an Uber bill amongst friends (oh, and the not-so-casual barrage of texts to those past-due on their amount owed).

Now picture the endless Goyard duffle bags slipping off your arm, overflowing with practically an entire summer’s worth of clothing for one weekend. We’re all guilty of committing this clearly unnecessary crime, and end up using around 15% of the total baggage we lug like weightlifters to and from the Hamptons.

But now you can cast your worries (and baggage) aside, because there’s a new service in town. Local entrepreneur, Danielle Candela, has created the solution to solve every weekender’s first class, first world problems. Her company, Tote Taxi, will transport your bags, golf clubs, bicycle, designer duffles, and more all across the island. Plus, the service has teamed up with BLADE to offer door-to-door pickup, and eliminate the issue of weight restrictions on your flight.

With plans to expand, Tote Taxi currently offers service from Manhattan on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, and from Montauk to New York on Sunday and Monday.

Book a bag and check out the service HERE. Believe us, it’s tote-ally perfect.

 

 

Written By: Danielle Spoleti

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A massive, wildly decorated within an inch of its life, nine-bedroom, 11-bathroom, five-and-a-half-bath, approximately 32,000-square-foot home is for sale in Wappinger Falls. Referred to as the “Fifth Avenue of Country Living,” this sprawling 25-acre estate is asking $30 million. With a sculpture garden, basketball and tennis courts, swimming pool with two cabanas, 8,000-square-foot veranda, three playgrounds, private guest cottages and an ice rink and more, this compound is truly unique.

1111 Route 376

Owned by the New York City socialite, artist and lifestyle brand Old Fashioned Mom CEO Michelle-Marie Heinemann, this Hudson Valley estate is decorated and decorated and decorated. Heinemann told the Wall Street Journal: “It’s been like a little baby in a cradle. It’s been loved, adored and respected and, as a result, it’s grown.”

Heinemann, who says she is “moved by color and texture,” covered every wall, floor and ceiling with something either wildly colorful or ornate. The entrance all greets guests with painted stairs and a two-story filled with art.

1111 Route 376

1111 Route 376

The three-story solarium lets in tons of natural light (clearly enough to grow blue trees).

1111 Route 376

The dining room, that can easily fit a 20-person table plus an extra seating area, has sloped, cloud painted ceilings and wood floors.

1111 Route 376

The kitchen has two banquettes and built-in cabinets.

1111 Route 376

There are some cozier rooms in the home but all have ornate lighting fixtures and fireplaces. Every room has either visual or physical access to the outside.

1111 Route 376

A formal antechamber has ornate stained glass windows, wallpaper on the walls and ceilings and french doors leading to the veranda.

1111 Route 376

A gorgeous, two-story solarium is large enough to have two seating areas and a grand piano. The 35-foot tall glass is bulletproof.

1111 Route 376

1111 Route 376

1111 Route 376

The outdoor spaces are very stately and provide a variety of viewing areas, whether it’s over the sculpture garden or by a roaring fire.

1111 Route 376

1111 Route 376

There are also basketball and tennis courts.

1111 Route 376

1111 Route 376

And a spacious private guest cottage where friends can stay for extraordinarily long amounts of time and never get in owner’s way.

There is also a solarium, two libraries, eight wood-burning fireplaces, two kitchens, a wine cellar, an ice rink, a home theatre, a three-story glass rotunda in private wing, multiple verandas and an art gallery. There are also three “tiny houses” on the property, ranging from 550 to 675 square feet, to house staff.

As if all of that was not odd enough, there is an “apartment” in the property that is listed on HomeAway for $324 a night. So if you are thinking of buying, maybe just spend a few nights and see what you think.

 

Written By: Michelle Colman

All photos courtesy of Douglas Elliman

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WOW: The property includes an ice rink, a home theatre, a 3-story glass rotunda​, many verandas, an art gallery and a sculpture garden.

 

Celebrity CEO's Hudson Valley Estate For Sale for $30 Million

HUDSON VALLEY, NY — New York City-based socialite, philanthropist, artist and Old Fashioned Mom CEO Michelle-Marie Heinemann has listed her 32,000-square-foot country estate at 1111 Route 376 in Wappingers Falls for $30 million.

Heinemann is known for her art work, paintings and vivacious lifestyle, and was twice courted to be a member of The Real Housewives of New York cast (turning down the opportunities due to family obligations).

She is currently exploring New York City storefront locations for her Old Fashioned Mom-brand coffee, and a Palm Beach location for an Old Fashioned Mom-brand boutique hotel.

She was just in England for the Royal Wedding celebrations. The estate is one of the crown jewels of the Hudson Valley.

Its 25.14 acres offer complete solitude while conveniently located on Route 376, which has been called the 5th Avenue of Country Living.

The colonial mansion includes nine bedrooms, eleven bathrooms, five half-baths, a solarium, two libraries, eight wood-burning fireplaces, two kitchens, a wine cellar, an ice rink, a home theatre, a three-story glass rotunda in private wing, multiple verandas, and an art gallery.

There is an 8,000 square foot veranda with panoramic views of the sculpture gardens. The mansion displays an eclectic mix of antiques, keepsakes and cherished artwork.

Also on the property is a 3-car garage above which sits an artist’s studio. The manicured property includes seven formal gardens, two swimming pools (indoor and outdoor) with pool cabana, a tennis court, a basketball court, three playgrounds and an English conservatory.

This residence evokes a spirit of comfort and an entertaining ambience at every turn. It’s a one-of-a-kind masterpiece awaiting that one client seeking grand and extraordinary.

 

Douglas Elliman’s Anthony Debellis (914-618-1737) is marketing the property.

 

 

Written By: Lanning Taliaferro

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SONY Affirm Film Subject, Aimée Marcoux-Spurlock, Makes Metropolitan Room debut…..on February 3rd….arriving in full Soprano Star Mode.

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by BWW News Desk
Classical singer/musical actress, Aimée Marcoux-Spurlock, whose true-life story will come to the big screen in 2017, will make her Metropolitan Room debut on February 3rd with Women of Bilbao, a collection of Kurt Weill’s compositions from his 12-tone Weimar period to his more lush Broadway compositions. Marcoux-Spurlock has performed over fifty operatic, musical theater and oratorio roles with leading orchestras and opera companies across the globe. The Women of Bilbao repertoire will include “Surabaya Johnny” from Happy End, “Moon of Alabama,” from The Rise and Fall of the City ofMahagonny and “That’s Him” from One Touch of Venus. The singer will be joined by Doug Martin as Pianist/ Conductor (Baz Luhrmann’s La Bohème on Broadway).

Michael Feingold, noted arts critic (Village Voice), is the Creative Consultant. Metropolitan Room is at 34 West 22nd Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan. Showtime on February 3rd is 9:00 p.m.. Call: 212.206.0440 for reservations and information. Tickets can be purchased online at : metropolitanroom.com  A $24 cover charge and $25 minimum per person apply.

The true story of Aimée Marcoux-Spurlock, and her husband, Michael Spurlock, will be told in the upcoming Sony Affirm pictures release “All Saints,” scheduled for 2017 release. The film recounts the story of professional-turned-pastor Michael Spurlock (actor John Corbett), Aimée-Marcoux-Spurlock (actress Cara Buono) and a group of refugees from Southeast Asia, who risk everything to save their tiny church in Tennessee and transform their future.
Marcoux-Spurlock is a musical actress known for her depth of character, interpretation and musical sensitivity. She has appeared in productions with the Florida Grand Opera, New World Symphony Orchestra, Symphony of the Americas, Florentine Opera, Florida Philharmonic Orchestra, The Bulgarian National Orchestra, Opera Frankfurt, Paraguay Symphony Orchestra and The Hungarian State Opera. Her role in Marin Alsop’s revival of Gershwin’s rare Blue Monday with Colorado Symphony Orchestra was described as “sumptuous” by the Denver Post. In 2013, Marcoux-Spurlock premiered The Yellow Wallpaper a one-woman opera written for her by composer and Duke University Professor, Michael Trinastic.

In a departure from her musical career, Marcoux-Spurlock worked as a reporter and producer for several years with Reuters Television, Showtime, the BBC, NBC and Fox affiliates throughout the United States. She was an original reporter/producer for Entertainment Drive, one of the first online new outlets. Marcoux-Spurlock has been spotted at The Emmys, The Tony Awards and the Academy Awards interviewing such celebrities as Sir Anthony Hopkins, Salma Hayek, Tony Bennett, and Mariah Carey. At the United Nations, she interviewed Kofi Annan, Senator Bill Richardson, President Bill Clinton and HRH Prince Phillip. In addition, Marcoux-Spurlock spent fourteen seasons covering New York’s Fashion Week for fashion and entertainment news outlets.

Her spur of the moment coverage of the events of September 11, 2001 was featured in the 2002 HBO documentary, “IN MEMORIAM – New York City, 9/11/01.” In addition, Marcoux-Spurlock was lauded by The Royal Television Society as “an invisible giant of TV news” for her coverage at Ground Zero and received and award of recognition.

We love Aimee here at Old Fashioned Mom….and so excited about her performance!!!