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Posts Tagged ‘best coffee in the world’

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Aaron E. Carroll answered readers’ questions about this article in a follow-up here.

When I was a kid, my parents refused to let me drink coffee because they believed it would “stunt my growth.” It turns out, of course, that this is a myth. Studies have failed, again and again, to show that coffee or caffeine consumption are related to reduced bone mass or how tall people are.

Coffee has long had a reputation as being unhealthy. But in almost every single respect that reputation is backward. The potential health benefits are surprisingly large.

When I set out to look at the research on coffee and health, I thought I’d see it being associated with some good outcomes and some bad ones, mirroring the contradictory reports you can often find in the news media. This didn’t turn out to be the case.

Image result for coffee

Just last year, a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies looking at long-term consumption of coffee and the risk of cardiovascular disease was published. The researchers found 36 studies involving more than 1,270,000 participants. The combined data showed that those who consumed a moderate amount of coffee, about three to five cups a day, were at the lowest risk for problems. Those who consumed five or more cups a day had no higher risk than those who consumed none.

Of course, everything I’m saying here concerns coffee — black coffee. I am not talking about the mostly milk and sugar coffee-based beverages that lots of people consume. These could include, but aren’t limited to, things like a McDonald’s large mocha (500 calories, 17 grams of fat, 72 grams of carbohydrates), a Starbucks Venti White Chocolate Mocha (580 calories, 22 grams of fat, 79 grams of carbs), and a Large Dunkin’ Donuts frozen caramel coffee Coolatta (670 calories, 8 grams of fat, 144 grams of carbs).

I won’t even mention the Cold Stone Creamery Gotta-Have-It-Sized Lotta Caramel Latte (1,790 calories, 90 grams of fat, 223 grams of carbs). Regular brewed coffee has 5 or fewer calories and no fat or carbohydrates.

Back to the studies. Years earlier, a meta-analysis — a study of studies, in which data are pooled and analyzed together — was published looking at how coffee consumption might be associated with stroke. Eleven studies were found, including almost 480,000 participants. As with the prior studies, consumption of two to six cups of coffee a day was associated with a lower risk of disease, compared with those who drank none. Another meta-analysis published a year later confirmed these findings.

Rounding out concerns about the effect of coffee on your heart, another meta-analysis examined how drinking coffee might be associated with heart failure. Again, moderate consumption was associated with a lower risk, with the lowest risk among those who consumed four servings a day. Consumption had to get up to about 10 cups a day before any bad associations were seen.

No one is suggesting you drink more coffee for your health. But drinking moderate amounts of coffee is linked to lower rates of pretty much all cardiovascular disease, contrary to what many might have heard about the dangers of coffee or caffeine. Even consumers on the very high end of the spectrum appear to have minimal, if any, ill effects.

A meta-analysis published in 2007 found that increasing coffee consumption by two cups a day was associated with a lower relative risk of liver cancer by more than 40 percent. Two more recent studiesconfirmed these findings. Results from meta-analyses looking at prostate cancer found that in the higher-quality studies, coffee consumption was not associated with negative outcomes.

Shots of espresso. The potential health benefits of coffee have been found to be surprisingly large.CreditKevork Djansezian/Getty Images

The same holds true for breast cancer, where associations were statistically not significant. It’s true that the data on lung cancer shows an increased risk for more coffee consumed, but that’s only among people who smoke. Drinking coffee may be protective in those who don’t. Regardless, the authors of that study hedge their results and warn that they should be interpreted with caution because of the confounding (and most likely overwhelming) effects of smoking.

A study looking at all cancers suggested that it might be associated with reduced overall cancer incidence and that the more you drank, the more protection was seen.

Drinking coffee is associated with better laboratory values in those at risk for liver disease. In patients who already have liver disease, it’s associated with a decreased progression to cirrhosis. In patients who already have cirrhosis, it’s associated with a lower risk of death and a lower risk of developing liver cancer. It’s associated with improved responses to antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C and better outcomes in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The authors of the systematic review argue that daily coffee consumption should be encouraged in patients with chronic liver disease.

The most recent meta-analyses on neurological disorders found that coffee intake was associated with lower risks of Parkinson’s disease, lower cognitive decline and a potential protective effect against Alzheimer’s disease (but certainly no harm).

A systematic review published in 2005 found that regular coffee consumption was associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, with the lowest relative risks (about a third reduction) seen in those who drank at least six or seven cups a day. The latest study, published in 2014, used updated data and included 28 studies and more than 1.1 million participants. Again, the more coffee you drank, the less likely you were to have diabetes. This included both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Is coffee associated with the risk of death from all causes? There have been two meta-analyses published within the last year or so. The first reviewed 20 studies, including almost a million people, and the second included 17 studies containing more than a million people. Both found that drinking coffee was associated with a significantly reduced chance of death. I can’t think of any other product that has this much positive epidemiological evidence going for it.

I grant you that pretty much none of the research I’m citing above contains randomized controlled trials. It’s important to remember that we usually conduct those trials to see if what we are observing in epidemiological studies holds up. Most of us aren’t drinking coffee because we think it will protect us, though. Most of us are worrying that it might be hurting us. There’s almost no evidence for that at all.

If any other modifiable risk factor had these kind of positive associations across the board, the media would be all over it. We’d be pushing it on everyone. Whole interventions would be built up around it. For far too long, though, coffee has been considered a vice, not something that might be healthy.

That may change soon. The newest scientific report for the U.S.D.A. nutritional guidelines, which I’ve discussed before, says that coffee is not only O.K. — it agrees that it might be good for you. This was the first time the dietary guideline advisory committee reviewed the effects of coffee on health.

There’s always a danger in going too far in the other direction. I’m not suggesting that we start serving coffee to little kids. Caffeine still has a number of effects parents might want to avoid for their children. Some people don’t like the way caffeine can make them jittery. Guidelines also suggest that pregnant women not drink more than two cups a day.

I’m also not suggesting that people start drinking coffee by the gallon. Too much of anything can be bad. Finally, while the coffee may be healthy, that’s not necessarily true of the added sugar and fat that many people put into coffee-based beverages.

But it’s way past time that we stopped viewing coffee as something we all need to cut back on. It’s a completely reasonable addition to a healthy diet, with more potential benefits seen in research than almost any other beverage we’re consuming. It’s time we started treating it as such.

Written By: Aaron E. Carroll

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Coffee

The benefits of coffee have been the topic of a lot of news reports lately. It’s not just black water with caffeine. A growing body of research has shown coffee has many incredible health benefits beyond the morning caffeine pick me up.

Is coffee good for you? Yes! Studies have shown that that drinking coffee every day can help lower your risk of many serious health conditions and even help you feel better.

In this article we will discuss the health benefits of coffee, cover how much coffee you should drink per day,  and then I even provided some coffee drink recipes that can help you discover new ways of enjoying your daily coffee in a healthy way. So let’s get into it and see how coffee can positively affect your body and mind!

Health Benefits of Coffee

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Here are some amazing reasons why you should drink more coffee:

1. Coffee Raises Your Metabolism and Helps You Perform Better Physically

Studies have shown that drinking coffee can actually raise your metabolism and help you burn fat at a faster rate, thus positively affecting your weight loss. Caffeine does this by stimulating your nervous system, causing it to send signals to your fat cells to break down body fat.

It also has been shown to improve athletic performance and endurance during exercise.

Just these two reasons alone are awesome enough to drink more coffee, especially before heading to the gym!

2. Coffee Is a Great Sources of Antioxidants and Essential Nutrients

Believe it or not, coffee has a lot of nutritional value. It contains a number of essential nutrients, including riboflavin (11% of the RDA), pantothenic acid (6% of the RDA), manganese (3% of the RDA), potassium (3% of the RDA), magnesium (2% of the RDA) and niacin (2% of the RDA)

It’s also a HUGE source of antioxidants, and one of the top sources of antioxidants in the American diet. Antioxidants are substances that prevent or delay cell damage, and they can control how fast you age by fighting free radicals.

Translation…. Coffee makes you pretty and healthy!

So the next time you look at your coffee, remember it’s not just black water, it’s a tasty source of antioxidants and nutrients.

3. Coffee Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes, an enormous health problem everywhere with over 400 million sufferers, affects about 8% of adults over the age of 18 affected worldwide.

Studies show that people who drink coffee have a significantly lower risk of developing Type II diabetes. In one study, participants with a total daily consumption of at least three cups of coffee reduced the risk of type 2 diabetes by approximately 42%.

If you’re concerned about diabetes, you may want to start including coffee in your diet on a regular basis to improve your chances of preventing it. But make sure to limit the sugar you add and see below for my tips on healthy(er) sweeteners below.

4. Coffee Can Make You Smarter

Coffee contains a chemical called caffeine… yes, I know you know that, but did you know that caffeine is central nervous system stimulant?! When you drink coffee, the caffeine travels to the brain where it is responsible for enhancing the firing of the neurons and increasing energy metabolism throughout your brain.

The next time you need to study or take a test, try drinking a cup of coffee beforehand for a little extra mental edge.

5. May Help Prevent Liver Disease

If you drink alcohol on a regular basis, listen up!

Studies have shown that there is an ingredient in coffee that protects against a liver disease called cirrhosis. If you have never heard of cirrhosis before, it a condition where your liver tissue is damaged and replaced with scar tissue. It can develop several ways like from infections, obesity, and other conditions, but especially from drinking too much alcohol. Drinking coffee on a regular basis has been shown to be a natural detox to help protect against the onset of cirrhosis, especially alcoholic cirrhosis.

So while I don’t advocate drinking too much alcohol, I can recommend drinking coffee regularly if you do as a cleansing body detox and to help give your liver a little extra protection.

Coffee Benefits Heart Health

6. Coffee May Help Protect Against Heart Disease and Stroke

There have been studies that show that moderate coffee drinking lowered the risk of coronary heart disease in women.

Research has also shown that higher coffee consumption reduced the risks of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

Obviously, drinking coffee isn’t going to completely eliminate your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke (you need good diet, lifestyle habits, and good genes as well). But if just adding coffee to your diet helps lower your risks, why not try it?

7. Caffeine May Lower Skin Cancer Risk

A study by the National Institute of Health found that higher coffee intake was associated with a modest decrease in risk of a certain type of skin cancer called melanoma.

If you’re concerned about your risk of skin cancer, try adding a few cups of coffee to your diet to help lower your risks. And don’t forget your SPF while you’re at it!

8. Caffeine Can Help Protect You From Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a type of disease that causes problems with your memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms usually develop slowly and get worse over time, becoming severe enough to eventually interfere with daily tasks. If you’ve ever know somebody with AD or dementia, you know how devastating this condition can be, not just on the sufferer but to those around them as well.

Research has found that drinking 3-5 cups per day while in your middle aged years was associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia by about 65% in your later years.

Did you get that?? A 65% reduction in your chances of developing dementia by drinking 3-5 cups of coffee a day! That is one of the most compelling arguments in favor of drinking coffee every day that’s I’ve even heard, especially if you’re in your 40’s and 50’s.

9. Coffee May Help Reduce Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic disorder that involves the malfunction and death of certain nerve cells in the brain (neurons). It’s a progressive disease, meaning that symptoms get worse over time. The cause is unknown, and there is no cure.

Worldwide, nearly 7 million people are living with Parkinson’s disease.

Studies have shown that higher coffee and caffeine intake is associated with a significantly lower incidence of Parkinson’s Disease.

This benefit, along with the reduction in AD and dementia, make coffee an important part of your strategy to get older without losing your mental strength and clarity.

10. Coffee May Lower Your Risk of Being Depressed

Depression is a chronic and serious mood disorder that affects twice as many women as men. It causes severe symptoms that affect how you think, feel, and deal with day to day activities like sleeping, eating, or working. Approximately 20% of women will be affected by depression during their lifetime.

Studies have found that increased coffee consumption decreased the risk of depression.

It’s not entirely clear why this occurs, but it’s another great reason to drink coffee! So next time you’re “blue” treat yourself to a cup and if possible some nature and sunshine… which also helps reduce depression!

How Many Cups Of Coffee Should You Drink A Day

How Many Cups Of Coffee Should You Drink A Day?

Every one of these reasons tend to indicate that you should be drinking more than one cup of coffee a day for the best results.

According to research, it’s recommended that adults should consume 3-4 cups of coffee a day to realize the most health benefits.

Coffee Drink Recipes

Coffee Drink Recipes

If you’re looking for some new ways to enjoy coffee, try these delicious coffee drink recipes from my blog.

  • Almond Milk Latte
  • Blended Mocha Cappuccino

These two drinks tend to be on the sweeter side, so they may be best as a dessert treat and not a substitution for a plain old cup of black coffee in the morning. But feel free to experiment with new ideas and ingredients to expand your coffee drink options.

Just make sure you are not adding loads of sugar as that will just negate the benefits. If you are looking for diabetic friendly sweeteners for your “Morning Joe” try honey, real maple syrup or raw Stevia, and try to add as little as possible so you develop a taste for less sugar.

I recommend using organic coffee when you can for the most healthy benefits without the risk of chemicals or toxins. And whenever possible try not to use tap water, you want good clean water that is not filled with fluoride as it changes chemistry when heated.

Conclusion

After all this research, I’ve answered the question: Is coffee good for you? YES!

Drinking coffee every day is not just a treat, it’s actually healthy for you, too! With all the great reasons you can stop feeling guilty about indulging and celebrate the benefits of drinking coffee today!

So drink up and reap all the benefits of drinking coffee!

 

Written By: Lose Weight By Eating

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