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~Sports with Hudson Heinemann~

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……A little about myself…..my name is Hudson Heinemann and I am 10 years old, I was born on Halloween and have the most amazing birthday parties because of it. ( thank you Mother! ) I am in the 4th grade and really like School. I have great teachers and friends, but what I love more than anything is Sports!!! Whatever it is, it doesn’t matter, if it relates to Sports I want to know about it.

 

My favorite sport is basketball, which led me to a wonderful School called IMG Academy. I attended their Sports Camp over the Holidays and it really was extraordinary.

 

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It is a Boarding Camp, and I stayed a week. Having attended other Camps, I found this Camp to really focus on bringing out the strengths of all the players. I became stronger and my technique really improved.

My favorite NBA team is the Knicks and currently they are not doing very well. They are 12th in the Eastern Conference with a record of 22 wins and 33 loses. Why is this? Some speculate horrible defense, I concur.

 

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Jeff Hornacek, the head coach was not happy at Friday’s night game against the Denver Nuggets with the teams 131-123 loss. The crowd was fired up at Madison Square Garden. “Couldn’t guard anybody, simply as that” Hornacek said. “They should be embarrassed by the way that couldn’t guard anybody. So those guys are happy scoring their points. We’re going to lose every game.”

Clearly he was upset, but who could blame him. I personally am glad to see some emotion in a Coach.

The Knicks allowed Denver to shoot 56.8 percent from the field, including 50 percent from beyond the arc. The Nuggets also racked up 30 assists. Power Forward Nikola Jokie led the way by making 17 of his 23 shots en route to 40 points.

 

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The loss was the fourth straight for the Knicks, who are 3-7 over their past 10 games and 22-33 on the regular season. They are 3.5 games out of the eighth spot in the Eastern Conference and may not make the  playoffs if things don’t change.

 

In conclusion:

~highly recommend IMG Academy

1-866-234-5729

5650 Bollettieri Blvd.

Bradenton, Fl. 34210

www.imgacademy.com

~Knicks need better defense

 

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The great philosopher ( and possibly basketball coach ) Aristotle once said, “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore is not an act, but a habit.”
I couldn’t agree more with this as I have always subscribed to the School of thought that James Allen so poetically penned in 1903 in his literary essay As A Man Thinketh…..A man is literally what he thinks, his character being the complete sum of all his thoughts.
Most little boy’s dream of being a professional athlete at some point in their life, mine wants to play for the NBA and Notre Dame…my son is 9, so the journey begins with hard work and dedication ….and a Great Coach. Jim Santoro is exactly this, as he is the Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Our Lady of Lourdes and Director of Edge Athletics Camp, Clinics and Programs. I remember the first time I saw him in action coaching the boys….the drills were extremely challenging and they were repeated multiple times, Jim made it look effortless as he demonstrated, however it was not.
Leadership, Knowledge, Motivation, Knows the Athlete, Consistency and Effective Communication Skills is where the line is drawn in the sand between good and great coaches. Jim possesess all of these traits and having raised four boys of his own in the very competitive arena of basketball knows how to handle the temperament of each child.
I applaud the dedication and long term vision Coaches have for their athletes and thank Jim for his commitment to children. We here at Old Fashioned Mom are proud to introduce Jim Santora as our 5th Celebrity Father!

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Evan Sims, Christian Versaci, Hudson Heinemann and Friends.

 

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1.What is the most challenging aspect of being a Coach?

Coaching presents many challenges at every age level and in every capacity. It is, therefore, hard to come up with the most challenging aspect, so I will offer up two.  The first one is communicating to athletes in a way that creates a fun environment that gets them to want to work hard at improving their individual and collective team skills. Each athlete, regardless of age, is unique and has to be approached with whatever means is going to best motivate him or her to reach their full potential.

 

The second challenge is how to deal with parental concerns and how to best guide them. Parents generally have at least the one common goal of wanting the best for their child.  As a coach of just not one team, but a director of an entire program, I find it very challenging helping parents “grow” as their child progresses from being a very young athlete to an athlete competing at higher levels.  Helping parents manage the emotions of successes and failures of their own child, as well as their team, can be very difficult.

 

2.Please tell us about your children?

 

I am very blessed to have four children, all boys, and all are healthy and happy.

 

My oldest son, Rob, is married and works in Manhattan for a major law firm. He started his own company designing websites at age 12 and has always had a love for business and entrepreneurship.  He attended Binghamton University as an undergraduate before obtaining his Juris Doctor Degree at the University of Buffalo.  Rob and his wife, Amelia, just recently had their first child and my first grandson, Landon.

 

My second oldest, Chris, lives locally, and is a Partner with New York Life. Chris graduated from Nichols College where he got both his undergraduate degree in Sports Management and Masters in Business Administration.  Prior to his current career, he worked for the New York Knicks, the Miami Heat, and the New Jersey Nets. He was, and still is, one of those happy go lucky guys that truly enjoys people and life. He is a very hard worker with a great personality and just a lot of fun to be around.

 

Kelby, my third child, just graduated from SUNY Oneonta this spring.  He is probably the quietest of my four boys, at least until you get to know him.  He has a very loyal personality and is similar to his older brother, Rob, in a lot of ways.  Unsure of what’s up next after college, he is currently looking at different types of employment options.  He loves to be by the water, whether it’s the ocean or the lake, and thoroughly enjoys hanging out with his brothers.

 

That leaves Kyle, my youngest son.  Kyle transferred from SUNY Potsdam, but has not yet selected his next school. He has narrowed down his choices to several schools, where he will continue his basketball career while pursuing a business degree. He loves to compete and is also the daredevil in the family.  Fast and wild are his thing. He attempted his first bungee jump at 6 but had to wait patiently until he was of legal age to sky dive at 18.

 

All four of my boys are very close and extremely competitive.  They all played basketball for me at the high school level, and all played at the collegiate level in some capacity.  They thoroughly enjoy being with each other and traveling together.  I am very lucky to have four kids that were and remain so close as they grow older.

3. How would you describe yourself?

 

For as far back as I can remember, helping others succeed has been at my core. As a Big Brother and coach I have always worked with kids to help them to succeed.  As a manager at IBM, my goal was to help employees advance their own careers. Aside from that, others tell me that I am fanatical, committed, have OCD, and sometimes even a little crazy!

 

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4. Do you feel athletic talent is created or some children are born with it?

I think both are true.  There are many athletes that are born with the ability or “gift” that enables them to excel in their respective sport.  But there are also those athletes that just simply work hard, and work hard for many years to develop their skill.

There is, however, a significant difference between the two.  First, just because an athlete is born with certain genetics or traits that can’t be taught or acquired, does not mean that they will be exceptional athletes or that their talent will prevail.  They still must invest countless hours to develop that talent and reach their maximum potential. Those athletes that reach the collegiate or professional level are generally highly committed and driven, traits that may not necessarily be part of that “gift.”

On the other hand, there are those athletes that can excel by simply committing and working hard at what they do.  This, however, does not mean that working hard is a guarantee that an athlete will reach the level of success they desire to achieve.  Sometimes, the hard work is simply just not enough.

What I believe to be absolutely true is that those athletes that commit themselves to work as hard as they can are more likely to reach whatever full potential that their mind and body are capable of achieving.

5. What is a typical day for you?

A typical day for me changes depending on the time of year.  During the winter, I spend most of my time preparing my high school team to compete and succeed.  During the spring, I am heavily engaged with the management of our youth basketball program that serves 8-17 year olds.  In the summer, we switch gears a bit where I direct five weeks of camps.  And in the fall, I spend countless hours helping student athletes with the college recruiting, selection, and application process.

In addition, on an all-year-round basis, I teach basketball skills to athletes of all ages and levels on a more personal one on one or small group basis.

In general, my day begins fairly early to get all of the administrative tasks out of the way unless, of course, its camp season where my days and nights are somewhat reversed.  There are many tasks that have to be completed during the day including calls to college coaches, film review and scouting reports, practice preparations, and the planning and preparation that is required for the next season.

 

When that day’s work is done, I usually arrive at either the Our Lady of Lourdes or Poughkeepsie Day School gym by 3pm where I will spend the rest of the afternoon and evening coaching and teaching athletes, monitoring other teams’ practices, or consulting with parents.

 

6. Tell us about your basketball career and how you ended up in the coaching profession.

 

Although I started to play basketball in the 9th grade, I really didn’t invest any time into the sport until several years later.  I did not play CYO or attend any camps.  I made the junior high team as a freshman, Junior Varsity as a sophomore, and the Varsity as junior, basically because I was tall. At the end of my junior year, I became friends with an all-star athlete, Tom Emma, who eventually played for Duke University, the top Division I program in the country at the time.

 

Tom introduced me to the world of basketball and all of the hard work and commitment that went along with it to become successful. Spending countless hours, usually more than 8 hours a day during the summer, I remember burning through sneakers at a rate of a pair every two weeks.  After a fairly successful senior year both from an individual and team perspective, the continued hard work earned me a spot playing for Clarkson University for the next four years.  During the summers of my college years, I worked at many different overnight basketball camps.  It was then that I knew that coaching would be a part of my life.  I just did not realize at the time how big a part it would become.

 

My first job out of college was working for IBM in Poughkeepsie, New York, in August of 1982.  It did not take long to get involved with coaching in the local CYO program where I coached a 6th grade team.  Continuing to coach at the CYO level for the next four years was inevitable and led to my first high school position as the Junior Varsity coach at Our Lady of Lourdes.  I was named the Varsity coach two years later and have been there ever since.

 

Although successful at IBM, achieving management status in three years, I knew that coaching and teaching young athletes was my passion.  While working and advancing with IBM, I found myself spending more and more time, both physically and emotionally, with coaching.  Edge Athletics was formed in 1996 as a small program with one team and incorporated as a not for profit in 2001.  In 2007, after 25 years, I left IBM to run Edge Athletics and develop all-year programs on a full time basis. I remain the head Varsity coach at Lourdes and am heading into my 28th year.

7.What advice would you give young athletes today?

There are a few things that I tell young athletes to help them develop.

First and foremost, and simply put, they have to have fun.  That might sound like something easy to do and even a little bit of a cliché, but excelling at sports is a complex process.  If young athletes are not playing the sport because they love to play it and are not having fun playing it, then the rest of the process becomes even more complex and difficult. Unfortunately, the coach and the parents are key components for this to happen.

Next, and along the same lines, I stress to the athletes that they need to put in as much time – or as little time – as they want to.  I try to ensure that each athlete recognizes what it takes to be successful, but at the end of the day it is the athlete that has to want to do it more than their parents want them to.

And then finally, I encourage the athletes to set realistic goals for themselves.  It is okay to have a long term dream, but in order for athletes to improve, they must set realistic internal and measurable goals. Those goals can range from improving their shooting percentage, to earning a spot on a team, or earning a starting role on a team. Setting realistic measurable goals is a great way for young athletes to motivate themselves to work hard leading to self-confidence as they achieve them.

James C. Santoro

Director, Edge Athletics Camps, Clinics, and Programs

Head Men’s Basketball Coach, Our Lady of Lourdes High School

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gazette-logoHand-raising is a quick, cost-effective, time-tested technique for gauging student knowledge and progress, but it may not give an accurate picture of students’ grasp of a subject. A new Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) faculty working paper co-authored by Senior Lecturer Dan Levy, doctoral student Joshua Yardley and Professor Richard Zeckhauser examines the biases and challenges that result from hand-raising and the potential solutions offered by the use of “clickers” in the classroom.

“Since student satisfaction often correlates imperfectly with student learning, it is important to explore the ways in which clickers may impact learning specifically, in addition to the positive reviews they are getting from users,” the authors explain in the paper’s introduction.

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Richard Zeckhauser, Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Political Economy (L) and Dan Levy, Senior Lecturer (R) Clickers, the researchers argue, may be beneficial in allowing students to complete the learning process (thinking through their own independent responses to a question) and thus giving teachers a clearer picture of their students’ learning

 

The paper examines the possible benefits of clickers, chief among them anonymity – eliminating the usual “herding” behavior that can result when students are asked to raise their hands. Using a clicker, students are denied the opportunity to mimic other students, and are freed from the embarrassment or peer pressures that would promote certain choices. They can only choose independently.

The researchers conducted experiments in 22 different university classrooms, working with more than 1100 total respondents. Each classroom was divided into two groups: one with hand raising and the other with clickers. The response results differed significantly between the two groups. The hand-raising results were generally more clustered, consistent with the researchers’ theories on herding behavior.

“Those providing erroneous answers love company,” the authors note. But students may also “cluster” toward the responses of their classmates who are known to be knowledgeable about a topic, even if those answers are in the minority. For certain types of questions, the authors found that “clustering with others may also be helpful when there is no single right answer.”

While herding does sometimes push more students toward the correct answer to a question, the students may simply be following the crowd instead of arriving at the correct answer on their own. Clickers, the researchers argue, may be beneficial in allowing students to complete the learning process (thinking through their own independent responses to a question) and thus giving teachers a clearer picture of their students’ learning. Clickers also enable students to comfortably express minority or unpopular political views.

Besides allowing students to engage with questions on their own, clicked responses “can be an important source of feedback for teachers,” the authors explain. Yardley adds, “Clicker data that more accurately reflect student knowledge can help teachers make better informed real-time decisions regarding pacing and focus.” For example, Yardley says, “If clicker data suggest that students understand a particular concept, the teacher moves on, whereas if the data reveal student confusion, the teacher may decide to stay with the topic longer.”

“It seems likely that clicker responses give the teacher a better picture of where the students actually are in understanding a given concept or question,” the authors conclude. The study provides compelling evidence that hand-raising and clicker responses differ significantly from one another, and raises interesting questions about the potential use of both techniques in classrooms of the future.

Dan Levy is senior lecturer in public policy and Faculty Chair of the Kennedy School’s SLATE (Strengthening Learning and Teaching Excellence) Initiative. He teaches courses in quantitative methods and program evaluation. He recently directed impact evaluations of girl-friendly school construction programs in Burkina Faso and Niger.

Joshua Yardley is a Ph.D. candidate in Public Policy at Harvard University, with a focus on research in development economics and education.

Richard Zeckhauser is the Frank P. Ramsey Professor of Political Economy at Harvard Kennedy School. His contributions to decision theory and behavioral economics include the concepts of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), status quo bias, betrayal aversion, and ignorance (states of the world unknown) as a complement to the categories of risk and uncertainty. Many of his policy investigations explore ways to promote the health of human beings, to help markets work more effectively, and to foster informed and appropriate choices by individuals and government agencies.

 

Written By Katie Gibson

 

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FullSizeRender(18)MAKING THE FIRST DAY EASIER 

  • Remind your child that there are probably a lot of students who are uneasy about the first day of school. This may be at any age. Teachers know that students are nervous and will make an extra effort to make sure everyone feels as comfortable as possible.
  • Point out the positive aspects of starting school. She’ll see old friends and meet new ones. Refresh her positive memories about previous years, when she may have returned home after the first day with high spirits because she had a good time.
  • Find another child in the neighborhood with whom your student can walk to school or ride on the bus.
  • If it is a new school for your child, attend any available orientations and take an opportunity to tour the school before the first day.
  • If you feel it is needed, drive your child (or walk with her) to school and pick her up on the first day.

BACKPACK SAFETY

  • Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.
  • Pack light. Organize the backpack to use all of its compartments. Pack heavier items closest to the center of the back. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of your child’s body weight.
  • Always use both shoulder straps. Slinging a backpack over one shoulder can strain muscles.
  • If your school allows, consider a rolling backpack. This type of backpack may be a good choice for students who must tote a heavy load. Remember that rolling backpacks still must be carried up stairs, they may be difficult to roll in snow, and they may not fit in some lockers.

TRAVELING TO AND FROM SCHOOL 

Review the basic rules with your student:

School Bus

  • Children should always board and exit the bus at locations that provide safe access to the bus or to the school building.
  • Remind your child to wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
  • Make sure your child walks where she can see the bus driver (which means the driver will be able to see her, too).
  • Remind your student to look both ways to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street, just in case traffic does not stop as required.
  • Your child should not move around on the bus.
  • If your child’s school bus has lap/shoulder seat belts, make sure your child uses one at all times when in the bus. (If your child’s school bus does not have lap/shoulder belts, encourage the school system to buy or lease buses with lap/shoulder belts.}

Car

  • All passengers should wear a seat belt or use an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat.
  • Your child should ride in a car safety seat with a harness as long as possible and then ride in a belt-positioning booster seat. Your child is ready for a booster seat when she has reached the top weight or height allowed for her seat, her shoulders are above the top harness slots, or her ears have reached the top of the seat.
  • Your child should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle’s seat belt fits properly (usually when the child reaches about 4′ 9″ in height and is between 8 to 12 years of age). This means that the child is tall enough to sit against the vehicle seat back with her legs bent at the knees and feet hanging down and the shoulder belt lies across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not the neck or throat; the lap belt is low and snug across the thighs, not the stomach.
  • All children younger than 13 years of age should ride in the rear seat of vehicles. If you must drive more children than can fit in the rear seat (when carpooling, for example), move the front-seat passenger’s seat as far back as possible and have the child ride in a booster seat if the seat belts do not fit properly without it.
  • Remember that many crashes occur while novice teen drivers are going to and from school. You should require seat belt use, limit the number of teen passengers, and do not allow eating, drinking, cell phone conversations,  texting or other mobile device use to prevent driver distraction. Limit nighttime driving and driving in inclement weather. Familiarize yourself with your state’s graduated driver’s license law and consider the use of a parent-teen driver agreement to facilitate the early driving learning process. For a sample parent-teen driver agreement, see www.healthychildren.org/teendriver

Bike

  • Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
  • Ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic.
  • Use appropriate hand signals.
  • Respect traffic lights and stop signs.
  • Wear bright-colored clothing to increase visibility. White or light-colored clothing and reflective gear is especially important after dark.
  • Know the “rules of the road.”

Walking to School

  • Make sure your child’s walk to school is a safe route with well-trained adult crossing guards at every intersection.
  • Identify other children in the neighborhood with whom your child can walk to school.  In neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, consider organizing a “walking school bus,” in which an adult accompanies a group of neighborhood children walking to school.
  • Be realistic about your child’s pedestrian skills. Because small children are impulsive and less cautious around traffic, carefully consider whether or not your child is ready to walk to school without adult supervision.
  • If your children are young or are walking to a new school, walk with them the first week or until you are sure they know the route and can do it safely.
  • Bright-colored clothing will make your child more visible to drivers.

EATING DURING THE SCHOOL DAY

  • Studies show that children who eat a nutritious breakfast function better. They do better in school, and have better concentration and more energy.
  • Most schools regularly send schedules of cafeteria menus home and/or have them posted on the school’s website. With this advance information, you can plan on packing lunch on the days when the main course is one your child prefers not to eat.
  • Look into what is offered in school vending machines. Vending machines should stock healthy choices such as fresh fruit, low-fat dairy products, water and 100 percent fruit juice.  Learn about your child’s school wellness policy and get involved in school groups to put it into effect.
  • Each 12-ounce soft drink contains approximately 10 teaspoons of sugar and 150 calories. Drinking just one can of soda a day increases a child’s risk of obesity by 60%. Choose healthier options to send in your child’s lunch.

BULLYING 

Bullying or cyberbullying is when one child picks on another child repeatedly. Bullying can be physical, verbal, or social. It can happen at school, on the playground, on the school bus, in the neighborhood, over the Internet, or through mobile devices like cell phones.

When Your Child Is Bullied

  • Help your child learn how to respond by teaching your child how to:
    1. Look the bully in the eye.
    2. Stand tall and stay calm in a difficult situation.
    3. Walk away.
  • Teach your child how to say in a firm voice.
    1. “I don’t like what you are doing.”
    2. “Please do NOT talk to me like that.”
    3. “Why would you say that?”
  • Teach your child when and how to ask a trusted adult for help.
  • Encourage your child to make friends with other children.
  • Support activities that interest your child.
  • Alert school officials to the problems and work with them on solutions.
  • Make sure an adult who knows about the bullying can watch out for your child’s safety and well-being when you cannot be there.
  • Monitor your child’s social media or texting interactions so you can identify problems before they get out of hand.

When Your Child Is the Bully

  • Be sure your child knows that bullying is never OK.
  • Set firm and consistent limits on your child’s aggressive behavior.
  • Be a positive role mode. Show children they can get what they want without teasing, threatening or hurting someone.
  • Use effective, non-physical discipline, such as loss of privileges.
  • Develop practical solutions with the school principal, teachers, counselors, and parents of the children your child has bullied.

When Your Child Is a Bystander

  • Encourage your child to join with others in telling bullies to stop.
  • Encourage your child to tell a trusted adult about the bullying.
  • Help your child support other children who may be bullied. Encourage your child to include these children in activities.

BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE 

  • During early and middle childhood, youngsters need supervision. A responsible adult should be available to get them ready and off to school in the morning and supervise them after school until you return home from work.
  • If a family member will care for your child, communicate the need to follow consistent rules set by the parent regarding discipline and homework.
  • Children approaching adolescence (11- and 12-year-olds) should not come home to an empty house in the afternoon unless they show unusual maturity for their age.
  • If alternate adult supervision is not available, parents should make special efforts to supervise their children from a distance. Children should have a set time when they are expected to arrive at home and should check in with a neighbor or with a parent by telephone.
  • If you choose a commercial after-school program, inquire about the training of the staff. There should be a high staff-to-child ratio, and the rooms and the playground should be safe.

DEVELOPING GOOD HOMEWORK AND STUDY HABITS

  • Create an environment that is conducive to doing homework. Children need a consistent work space in their bedroom or another part of the home that is quiet, without distractions, and promotes study.
  • Schedule ample time for homework.
  • Establish a household rule that the TV and other electronic distractions stay off during homework time.
  • Supervise computer and Internet use.
  • Be available to answer questions and offer assistance, but never do a child’s homework for her.
  • Take steps to help alleviate eye fatigue, neck fatigue and brain fatigue while studying. It may be helpful to close the books for a few minutes, stretch, and take a break periodically when it will not be too disruptive.
  • If your child is struggling with a particular subject, and you aren’t able to help her yourself, a tutor can be a good solution. Talk it over with your child’s teacher first.
  • Some children need help organizing their homework. Checklists, timers, and parental supervision can help overcome homework problems.
  • If your child is having difficulty focusing on or completing homework, discuss this with your child’s teacher, school counselor, or health care provider.
  • Establish a good sleep routine. Insufficient sleep is associated with lower academic achievement in middle school, high school and college, as well as higher rates of absenteeism and tardiness. The optimal amount of sleep for most adolescents is in the range of 8.5 to 9.5 hours per night.

By The American Academy of Pediatrics

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