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Posts Tagged ‘Family Tradition’

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According to a recent report on publicly announced giving compiled by The Chronicle of Philanthropy – an organization that publishes news and resources on philanthropy – there were twelve donations given by wealthy donors that surpassed $100 million, plus another six that totaled $100 million exactly.

The two largest donations – for $500 million each – came from Nike cofounder Phil Knight and his wife Penny, and investor-philanthropist Nicolas Beggruen.

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Phil Knight~

Knight, a billionaire whose net worth Forbes estimates at $24.9 billion (making him the 18th wealthiest person in the United States), made his high-value gift to the University of Oregon – his alma mater – to establish there a new center for scientific research. Berggruen, with an estimate worth of $1.73 billion, donated to his own public policy think-tank, the Berggruen Institute.

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Nicolas Berggruen~

The second most valuable donation, a $400 million pledge, was also made by Mr. and Mrs. Knight. This trove of charity went to Stanford University to establish the Knight-Hennessy Scholars Program, which provides education to 100 graduate high achieving students every year.

Also providing a $400 million gift to a good cause was physician Howard Marcus and wife Lottie, an investor, who directed their money in the form of a bequest to American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev for endowment and water research. The donation was the largest ever to an Israeli university.

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg made a large charitable impact, The billionaire’s philanthropic organization gave $360 million to handful of organizations and an additional $300 million donation to The Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, to establish the Bloomberg American Health Initiative.

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Steven Cohen and wife Alexandra pledged $275 million last year to start the Cohen Veterans Network to provide mental-health services to former service members and their families. Cohen, whose net worth FORBES estimates at $13 billion, built his wealth in hedge funds.

Facebook founding president, Sean Parker, makes an appearance on the list of top donors of 2016, with a $250 million gift to establish the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Oracle founder, Larry Ellison, made the list as well, pledging $200 million to the University of Southern California, to establish the Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine.

Legendary investor and Berkshire Hathaway vice chairman Charlie Munger pledged $200 million to the University of California at Santa Barbara, for new student housing.

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Sanford Weill, chairman emeritus of Citigroup, and his wife, Joan, donated $185 million to the University of California at San Francisco, to start the Weill Institute for Neurosciences.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg donated $107.2 million to the Fidelity Charitable, for the Sheryl Sandberg & Dave Goldberg Fund.

Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen pledged $100 million to establish the Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group.

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Billionaire Phillip Frost, a physician and pharmaceutical company executive, and his wife, Patricia, pledged $100 million to the University of Miami, to support applied sciences and engineering.

David Geffen, a cofounder of DreamWorks Studios SKG and founder of Geffen Records, pledged $100 million to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, to renovate and expand the museum.

Netflix founder, Reed Hastings, gave $100 million to the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, to establish the Hastings Fund.

Robert King, founder of Peninsula Capital, and his wife, Dorothy, pledged $100 million to Stanford University, for scholarships for students from underdeveloped countries.

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Mortimer Zuckerman, a cofounder of Boston Properties, a real-estate investment trust, donated $100 million to create the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Scholars Program in STEM Leadership to bolster collaboration between top U.S. and Israeli researchers.

 

By Karsten Strauss

 

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Santa at the Macy’s Herald Square Santa Land (Photo: John Minchillo / AP Images for Macy’s)

Macy’s:
The Store is a standard bearer for Santa experiences in the city. Visiting the Herald Square flagship’s Santaland can involve a long wait and being herded through a line that snakes through the store’s eighth floor. But the payoff is worth it: The journey to Santa’s workshop takes visitors through a train “ride” (the floor vibrates along with bells clanging) and into the 13,000 square foot Christmas village. Santaland is open daily from Nov. 28 to Dec. 24 until 9pm. Opening times vary between 7am and 9am; go to the Santaland website to see the full schedule.  Should you not want to wait on line for longer than it would take to actually watch Miracle on 34th Street, make an advance reservation via kiosks in the cellar or on the 9th floor (only 20 are allowed per hour). Advance reservations are also available online 30 minutes to 48 hours in advance, beginning Nov. 26. 151 W 34th St., visitmacysnewyork.com

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Bloomingdale’s:
The eighth-floor children’s department at the Bloomingdale’s on 59th Street (at Lexington Ave.) is another popular place to see Santa, Nov. 28–Dec. 23 (11am-6pm weekdays, 10am-6pm weekends). Though the scene at the department store’s flagship location isn’t as elaborate as the one at Macy’s, fewer frills mean shorter lines — which can be the difference between Johnny smiling and crying by the time he poses for a picture with the world’s most popular reindeer driver. 1000 Third Ave., bloomingdales.com

Rockefeller Center:
If you want something more elaborate than just snapping a picture, two of the restaurants at Rockefeller Center host a Breakfast with Santa during the holiday season: The Sea Grill and Rock Center Café. Both packages include breakfast with Santa and carolers and ice skating on the famed Rockefeller Center ice skating rink, plus keepsakes like an ornament, photo frame and gifts for the kids. In 2014, the breakfasts will be held Nov. 28-30, Dec. 7, 13-14 and daily  Dec. 19-24. Breakfast at the Sea Grill is $110 for adults and $75 for children, while the Rock Center Café packages start at $80 for adults and $50 for children. Be sure to make reservations in advance — the breakfasts do sell out. rockefellercenter.com

ABC Carpet & Home:
As has been a holiday tradition for more than 20 years, the Santa at ABC Carpet & Home is available for photo opportunities in the Union Square neighborhood 11am–3pm Nov. 28–30 and Dec. 6, 13 and 20. The scene is apropos of a home-furnishings store, featuring an elaborate Victorian-style sitting area draped in velvet and filled with housewares. The wait here is also shorter than almost any other place you’ll visit in the city. 888 Broadway; abchome.com

Brookfield Place:
Santa, elves and reindeer are on hand at Santa’s Winter Garden at Brookfield Place in lower Manhattan. A professional photographer is on hand for photos (packages start at $20), and all proceeds go to Dancing Classrooms. The Battery Park City garden hosts Santa Dec. 5-7 9am-1:30pm and 3-6pm. Lines can be long, and are capped if staff thinks not everyone will be accommodated, so be sure to arrive early. 220 Vesey St.

New York City Fire Museum:
Visit the New York City Fire Museum on Dec. 7 at 11:30am for an unusual Santa-sighting. The museum’s annual Santa Rescue is more theater than a traditional visit, but it’s worth the watching: Saint Nick gets stuck on the roof and firefighters get out their hook-and-ladder to save him from peril. After families watch the rescue, they can head inside to sip hot cocoa at a holiday party and enjoy music from John Clacher’s Firehouse Band. Buy tickets in advance ($8 adults, $5 kids under 12) to ensure you’ll get in (tickets guarantee you’ll be sitting inside with Santa); as it is, the event is crowded every year, so in any case you’ll need to brace yourself for some jostling. 278 Spring St; nycfiremuseum.org